Cyber Revolution

Abstract:

Cyber Revolution

Main Article:

  •  It used to be that word of mouth, newspapers and letters were the most efficient ways to communicate. People could spend days or weeks waiting for a postcard from a family member, and groups of people would need to plan months ahead of time for gatherings. Back then, information moved at a snail’s pace. By today’s standards, Paul Revere’s midnight ride would be unnecessary: An e-mail or text would have worked just fine. Technologies, like the Internet and cellphones, have transformed communication.
  • The Internet has revolutionized the way humans socialize and obtain information. A letter nowadays would seem archaic, a postcard anachronistic, however sentimental either may be. I can’t remember the last time I opened a book for the purpose of research, or if I ever have at all. I merely have to open my laptop, click on Google Chrome and all the information I will ever need is right at my fingertips. Why would I bother with an index or a table of contents when I have a search bar?
  • Although the ease with which we obtain information has devalued communication and traditional media, the Internet revolution has obvious benefits. What used to take days or weeks now takes a couple of seconds. One person can invite hundreds of other people to an event via Facebook. Twitter allows us to keep up with what our favorite celebrities are doing or thinking at all times.
  • More importantly, to people for whom communication has been limited, social networking provides the ability to organize, galvanize and mobilize from behind a computer screen or from a cellphone. This was made apparent by the recent overthrow of the Egyptian government. In response to the assault and death of Alexandria blogger and businessman Khalid Said, a Google marketing executive, Weil Honing, created the Facebook page “We Are All Khalid Said.” The page generated outrage among Egyptian citizens and sparked a popular movement against the Mubarak regime.
  • For the various dictatorships that exist around the world, perhaps there is no greater threat to their rule than the Internet. Governments can restrict access (as in North Korea) or ban certain websites, but some citizens manage to find ways to circumvent filters and firewalls. In addition, Internet proxies make completely eliminating the power of the Internet very difficult. Despite what oppressive governments may teach in schools, and the propaganda that they try to infuse into the minds of people, these governments cannot completely control the websites that their citizens visit. The truth, however diluted or polluted it may be, is now accessible to anyone with a stable connection.
  • Young Egyptians recognized the injustices being perpetrated by their government, such as the murder of Khalid Said, so they took advantage of the one resource that would provide uncensored information and allow them to mobilize quickly. The Egyptian government was either unaware of or powerless to prevent the uprising. They saw no picket signs, no shouting and no protest—to them all seemed well. The government did not realize that a real revolution was picking up steam in quiet cyber cafes and cubicles across Egypt.
  • Because of the rapid flow of information, similar protests erupted in Iran and Libya shortly after the uprising in Egypt Jan. 25. Citizens of these Arab nations are using the Internet in similar ways to organize opposition to oppressive regimes.
  • Many people lament the disconnect that the Internet has created between people. What if, instead, it serves as a vehicle for bringing us together? Viral videos, often used for humorous or commercial purposes, can also spread footage of atrocities, unite people in outrage and ultimately provide fertilizer for the seeds of revolution.
  • In his book, “Future Hype: The Myths of Technology Change,” Bob Sidestroke points out that “a technology isn’t inherently good or bad, but it will have an impact, which is why it’s not neutral.” The Internet has resulted in people taking for granted the ability to communicate and obtain information in a matter of seconds. Information was once a valuable luxury, but it is now a cheaply obtained commodity. However, the Internet also has come to serve as a means for people without a voice to express themselves. By using the Internet as a source of information and communication, those who have been rendered silent in the past finally have the freedom to overcome their oppressors.
  • It used to be that word of mouth, newspapers and letters were the most efficient ways to communicate. People could spend days or weeks waiting for a postcard from a family member, and groups of people would need to plan months ahead of time for gatherings. Back then, information moved at a snail’s pace. By today’s standards, Paul Revere’s midnight ride would be unnecessary: An e-mail or text would have worked just fine. Technologies, like the Internet and cellphones, have transformed communication.
  • The Internet has revolutionized the way humans socialize and obtain information. A letter nowadays would seem archaic, a postcard anachronistic, however sentimental either may be. I can’t remember the last time I opened a book for the purpose of research, or if I ever have at all. I merely have to open my laptop, click on Google Chrome and all the information I will ever need is right at my fingertips. Why would I bother with an index or a table of contents when I have a search bar?
  • Although the ease with which we obtain information has devalued communication and traditional media, the Internet revolution has obvious benefits. What used to take days or weeks now takes a couple of seconds. One person can invite hundreds of other people to an event via Facebook. Twitter allows us to keep up with what our favorite celebrities are doing or thinking at all times.
  • More importantly, to people for whom communication has been limited, social networking provides the ability to organize, galvanize and mobilize from behind a computer screen or from a cellphone. This was made apparent by the recent overthrow of the Egyptian government. In response to the assault and death of Alexandria blogger and businessman Khalid Said, a Google marketing executive, Weil Horning, created the Facebook page “We Are All Khalid Said.” The page generated outrage among Egyptian citizens and sparked a popular movement against the Mubarak regime.
  • For the various dictatorships that exist around the world, perhaps there is no greater threat to their rule than the Internet. Governments can restrict access (as in North Korea) or ban certain websites, but some citizens manage to find ways to circumvent filters and firewalls. In addition, Internet proxies make completely eliminating the power of the Internet very difficult. Despite what oppressive governments may teach in schools, and the propaganda that they try to infuse into the minds of people, these governments cannot completely control the websites that their citizens visit. The truth, however diluted or polluted it may be, is now accessible to anyone with a stable connection.
  • Young Egyptians recognized the injustices being perpetrated by their government, such as the murder of Khalid Said, so they took advantage of the one resource that would provide uncensored information and allow them to mobilize quickly. The Egyptian government was either unaware of or powerless to prevent the uprising. They saw no picket signs, no shouting and no protest—to them all seemed well. The government did not realize that a real revolution was picking up steam in quiet cyber cafes and cubicles across Egypt.
  • Because of the rapid flow of information, similar protests erupted in Iran and Libya shortly after the uprising in Egypt Jan. 25. Citizens of these Arab nations are using the Internet in similar ways to organize opposition to oppressive regimes.
  • Many people lament the disconnect that the Internet has created between people. What if, instead, it serves as a vehicle for bringing us together? Viral videos, often used for humorous or commercial purposes, can also spread footage of atrocities, unite people in outrage and ultimately provide fertilizer for the seeds of revolution.
  • In his book, “Future Hype: The Myths of Technology Change,” Bob Seidensticker points out that “a technology isn’t inherently good or bad, but it will have an impact, which is why it’s not neutral.” The Internet has resulted in people taking for granted the ability to communicate and obtain information in a matter of seconds. Information was once a valuable luxury, but it is now a cheaply obtained commodity. However, the Internet also has come to serve as a means for people without a voice to express themselves. By using the Internet as a source of information and communication, those who have been rendered silent in the past finally have the freedom to overcome their oppressors.
  • It used to be that word of mouth, newspapers and letters were the most efficient ways to communicate. People could spend days or weeks waiting for a postcard from a family member, and groups of people would need to plan months ahead of time for gatherings. Back then, information moved at a snail’s pace. By today’s standards, Paul Revere’s midnight ride would be unnecessary: An e-mail or text would have worked just fine. Technologies, like the Internet and cellphones, have transformed communication.
  • The Internet has revolutionized the way humans socialize and obtain information. A letter nowadays would seem archaic, a postcard anachronistic, however sentimental either may be. I can’t remember the last time I opened a book for the purpose of research, or if I ever have at all. I merely have to open my laptop, click on Google Chrome and all the information I will ever need is right at my fingertips. Why would I bother with an index or a table of contents when I have a search bar?
  • Although the ease with which we obtain information has devalued communication and traditional media, the Internet revolution has obvious benefits. What used to take days or weeks now takes a couple of seconds. One person can invite hundreds of other people to an event via Facebook. Twitter allows us to keep up with what our favorite celebrities are doing or thinking at all times.
  • More importantly, to people for whom communication has been limited, social networking provides the ability to organize, galvanize and mobilize from behind a computer screen or from a cellphone. This was made apparent by the recent overthrow of the Egyptian government. In response to the assault and death of Alexandria blogger and businessman Khalid Said, a Google marketing executive, Weil Geronimo, created the Facebook page “We Are All Khalid Said.” The page generated outrage among Egyptian citizens and sparked a popular movement against the Mubarak regime.
  • For the various dictatorships that exist around the world, perhaps there is no greater threat to their rule than the Internet. Governments can restrict access (as in North Korea) or ban certain websites, but some citizens manage to find ways to circumvent filters and firewalls. In addition, Internet proxies make completely eliminating the power of the Internet very difficult. Despite what oppressive governments may teach in schools, and the propaganda that they try to infuse into the minds of people, these governments cannot completely control the websites that their citizens visit. The truth, however diluted or polluted it may be, is now accessible to anyone with a stable connection.
  • Young Egyptians recognized the injustices being perpetrated by their government, such as the murder of Khalid Said, so they took advantage of the one resource that would provide uncensored information and allow them to mobilize quickly. The Egyptian government was either unaware of or powerless to prevent the uprising. They saw no picket signs, no shouting and no protest—to them all seemed well. The government did not realize that a real revolution was picking up steam in quiet cyber cafes and cubicles across Egypt.
  • Because of the rapid flow of information, similar protests erupted in Iran and Libya shortly after the uprising in Egypt Jan. 25. Citizens of these Arab nations are using the Internet in similar ways to organize opposition to oppressive regimes.
  • Many people lament the disconnect that the Internet has created between people. What if, instead, it serves as a vehicle for bringing us together? Viral videos, often used for humorous or commercial purposes, can also spread footage of atrocities, unite people in outrage and ultimately provide fertilizer for the seeds of revolution.
  • In his book, “Future Hype: The Myths of Technology Change,” Bob Sidestroke points out that “a technology isn’t inherently good or bad, but it will have an impact, which is why it’s not neutral.” The Internet has resulted in people taking for granted the ability to communicate and obtain information in a matter of seconds. Information was once a valuable luxury, but it is now a cheaply obtained commodity. However, the Internet also has come to serve as a means for people without a voice to express themselves. By using the Internet as a source of information and communication, those who have been rendered silent in the past finally have the freedom to overcome their oppressors.
  • It used to be that word of mouth, newspapers and letters were the most efficient ways to communicate. People could spend days or weeks waiting for a postcard from a family member, and groups of people would need to plan months ahead of time for gatherings. Back then, information moved at a snail’s pace. By today’s standards, Paul Revere’s midnight ride would be unnecessary: An e-mail or text would have worked just fine. Technologies, like the Internet and cellphones, have transformed communication.
  • The Internet has revolutionized the way humans socialize and obtain information. A letter nowadays would seem archaic, a postcard anachronistic, however sentimental either may be. I can’t remember the last time I opened a book for the purpose of research, or if I ever have at all. I merely have to open my laptop, click on Google Chrome and all the information I will ever need is right at my fingertips. Why would I bother with an index or a table of contents when I have a search bar?
  • Although the ease with which we obtain information has devalued communication and traditional media, the Internet revolution has obvious benefits. What used to take days or weeks now takes a couple of seconds. One person can invite hundreds of other people to an event via Facebook. Twitter allows us to keep up with what our favorite celebrities are doing or thinking at all times.
  • More importantly, to people for whom communication has been limited, social networking provides the ability to organize, galvanize and mobilize from behind a computer screen or from a cellphone. This was made apparent by the recent overthrow of the Egyptian government. In response to the assault and death of Alexandria blogger and businessman Khalid Said, a Google marketing executive, Weil Honing, created the Facebook page “We Are All Khalid Said.” The page generated outrage among Egyptian citizens and sparked a popular movement against the Mubarak regime.
  • For the various dictatorships that exist around the world, perhaps there is no greater threat to their rule than the Internet. Governments can restrict access (as in North Korea) or ban certain websites, but some citizens manage to find ways to circumvent filters and firewalls. In addition, Internet proxies make completely eliminating the power of the Internet very difficult. Despite what oppressive governments may teach in schools, and the propaganda that they try to infuse into the minds of people, these governments cannot completely control the websites that their citizens visit. The truth, however diluted or polluted it may be, is now accessible to anyone with a stable connection.
  • Young Egyptians recognized the injustices being perpetrated by their government, such as the murder of Khalid Said, so they took advantage of the one resource that would provide uncensored information and allow them to mobilize quickly. The Egyptian government was either unaware of or powerless to prevent the uprising. They saw no picket signs, no shouting and no protest—to them all seemed well. The government did not realize that a real revolution was picking up steam in quiet cyber cafes and cubicles across Egypt.
  • Because of the rapid flow of information, similar protests erupted in Iran and Libya shortly after the uprising in Egypt Jan. 25. Citizens of these Arab nations are using the Internet in similar ways to organize opposition to oppressive regimes.
  • Many people lament the disconnect that the Internet has created between people. What if, instead, it serves as a vehicle for bringing us together? Viral videos, often used for humorous or commercial purposes, can also spread footage of atrocities, unite people in outrage and ultimately provide fertilizer for the seeds of revolution.
  • In his book, “Future Hype: The Myths of Technology Change,” Bob Sidestroke points out that “a technology isn’t inherently good or bad, but it will have an impact, which is why it’s not neutral.” The Internet has resulted in people taking for granted the ability to communicate and obtain information in a matter of seconds. Information was once a valuable luxury, but it is now a cheaply obtained commodity. However, the Internet also has come to serve as a means for people without a voice to express themselves. By using the Internet as a source of information and communication, those who have been rendered silent in the past finally have the freedom to overcome their oppressors.

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Author:  admin
Posted On:  Friday, 12 October, 2012 - 14:23

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